The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett (Discworld #2 / Rincewind #2)

the-colour-of-magicSomewhere on the frontier between thought and reality exists the Discworld, a parallel time and place which might sound and smell very much like our own, but which looks completely different. Particularly as it’s carried though space on the back of a giant turtle (sex unknown). It plays by different rules.

But then, some things are the same everywhere. The Disc’s very existence is about to be threatened by a strange new blight: the world’s first tourist, upon whose survival rests the peace and prosperity of the land. Unfortunately, the person charged with maintaining that survival in the face of robbers, mercenaries and, well, Death, is a spectacularly inept wizard…

Pages – 292 

Published – January 18th 1985

Rating – Should Read, 4 stars

the-light-fantasticIn The Light Fantastic only one individual can save the world from a disastrous collision. Unfortunately, the hero happens to be the singularly inept wizard Rincewind, who was last seen falling off the edge of the world…

Pages – 292

Published May 1986

Rating – Should Read, 4.5 stars

Read from January 13th to 15th

This book has so many beautifully abstract elements that you can’t help being compelling to continue reading to see the new concepts we are presented with.

I loved this book; I didn’t want to stop reading it. This is such a good story with amazing characters and a great story and world. The one thing about the books I’ve read is that they don’t really have a plot. They are a lovely example of storytelling for the sake of telling people ideas with an incredible world and really compelling characters.

This book just wants to be read and there’s a lovely mix of characters. It just so fun and interesting to read because the characters feel so real, the dialogue is done really well and the humour and sarcasm are great. It does feel very British and is done in that dry way and I felt really involved in it.

Again, I did struggle a bit with the pacing and the switch betweens due to no clear lines. This is usually done with chapter breaks but some books also do it with lines and segregation. It does fly by in this book more as there is more of a central adventure whereas the last book felt a bit broken up. It also did feel like these two books were one in terms of where we left off and the pacing.

I really like how the relationship between Twoflower and Rincewind has grown and developed because they now have this unlikely friendship that I just really want to be a part of. From reading the first book I honestly didn’t imagine growing so fond of the pair. They are still very different people that tackle situations in a completely opposite manner but surprisingly this compliments each other.

This book had a much stronger focus on magic and on the Unseen University – the top wizarding university – and the different levels of wizards. It was nice to see this but was hard to get your head around because it isn’t fully explained. I suppose that’s something that can be said for the whole book. It’s not detailed focussed and things are sort of left out for your to figure out and piece together. It’s not a starter fantasy book but it is in the sense of just wanting a story and an adventure.

I am looking forward to reading the next book and it is sitting on my shelf and I shall be getting to it soon.

Now, I know this is a massive series but I cannot recommend it enough. Just try the first book to get a feel of it and you might find yourself hooked and needing the next book like me.


Does anyone else find it strange reading books published before they were born,a nd 10 years at that?

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